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3 Surefire Ways to Boost Your Dog’s Brainpower

Have fun games for your dog to learn and play.

You can teach an old dog new tricks and in so doing, boost your dog’s brainpower. Just like us, dogs that don’t continually use their brains can lose the ability to function at a high level. Studies on the neurology of dogs have shown that one of the best things owners can do for their dogs is provide mental stimulation. No matter the form this takes, such as teaching the dog new tricks or giving the dog puzzle toys, research has shown that mental stimulation will lead to a much happier — and smarter — dog.

Personalized Training Can Make All the Difference.

Personalized Dog Training Classes

In order to test or bolster the IQ of your pet, training is essential to developing a basis of knowledge and instruction. In fact, dogs that participate in personalized training classes are less likely to develop cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS), which normally develops with old age and manifests as forgetfulness and general disorientation. In addition to undergoing training, there are several ways to boost your dog’s brainpower and improve their cognitive function for the long-term.

Hide and seek is a fun game for dogs too!

Improve Your Dog’s Vocabulary

Whenever we think of improving our own IQ, one of the immediate suggestions we hear is to learn a new language. In a similar vein, improving your dog’s use of language is a great way to boost brainpower. Even though we talk to our dogs on a daily basis, we don’t often times teach them what a word means. However, since dogs can’t talk, improving your dog’s vocabulary actually means teaching him/her how to associate words with certain actions.

For example, one command your dog probably knows is “go potty” or “go do your business.” For dogs, these words are immediately associated with going outside and, well, doing their business. Try teaching your dog new commands with new actions, as this will improve their IQ and make them smarter. We’ve all seen those dogs on TV or YouTube who can bring their owner a bag of chips or open the front door. You, too, can expand your dog’s vocabulary to learn new commands like these—much to the surprise of your neighbors and friends!

Your dog will be Ready to Play!

Get Playful with Brain Games

Another simple and fun way to improve your dog’s IQ is to create some brain games that will make them think. As mentioned before, stimulating their brains in anyway we’ll make them a happier and healthier dog overall. While everyone enjoys playing fetch, and that is great for exercise, the downside is that there is no real thinking involved for your dog.

Fortunately, there are many fun activities that are basically dog-versions of classic children’s games that will exercise both your dog’s body and brain. Here are some ideas to get you started:

 

 

 

  •      Create a backyard treasure hunt with hidden toys or treats
  •      Play hide-and-go-seek by having one of your friends or family members hide while you distract your dog, then releasing your dog to start looking for the hidden person
  •      Make cleaning a game! If your dog has mastered the command “drop it”, then  you can encourage him/her to pick up all of the toys lying around and “drop” the toys into a bin or box.
  •      Play red light, green light if your dog knows how to heel!

By improving your dog’s vocabulary and planning some fun brain games to play together, can boost your dog’s brainpower and make them a happier, healthier and smarter pet for years to come.

 

Service Dogs and Airline Travel: The Latest

Airline Crackdowns on Emotional Support Animals Incite Controversy

 

The Doggy Wisdom Workshop: Pro-Train’s One-Day-Only Group Dog Training, San Diego

Are you guys ready for the big day? You should be! There is only a week to go before the ProTrain’s group dog training in San Diego. This event entitled “The Doggy Wisdom Workshop: Behavior Modification Dog Trainer 101” is happening on February 17, 2018 (Saturday), which will give you a rare opportunity to experience a top-notch training program from one of the finest dog trainers in the country – Mark “Dogman” Castillero. So, mark your calendar now before you miss it.

If you have not booked a ticket to the event yet, do it now before the slots run out :). Here’s the link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-doggy-wisdom-workshop-behavior-modification-dog-trainer-tickets-37859193868

Why you should not miss the event

In this event, Mark “Dogman” Castillero, animal behaviorist, author, one of the founders of the California Kennel Association, and the Director of Training for Pro-Train since 1978, will cover the basics of how to become a dog trainer. And, if you are a dog owner who wants to learn more about dog training, this workshop is also for you.

At the end of this event, participants will have learned about:

  • Behavior modification (e.g. conditioning & counter-conditioning, habituation, and shaping)
  • Custom tailoring your services
  • Diversification
  • Problem solving and more

OPTIONAL: Evening BBQ/Mixer at Pro-Train in Vista for any enrollment in a program.

To apply for your dog to attend with you, please contact Mark directly at protraindog@gmail.com. Indicate the type of dog and the issue that needs to be corrected in your email.

Again, this your chance to meet dog training expert, animal behaviorist and author Mark “Dogman” Castillero in a rare one-day-only dog training workshop in San Diego, CA.

Get your ticket now – here: http://bit.ly/2E877z9

If there’s a problem with the ticket page or if you have more questions about this group dog training in San Diego, don’t hesitate to contact us at (760) 749-0897.

Private Dog Training Orange County

Private Dog Training Orange County

Are you searching for the absolute Private Dog Training Course in Orange County, CA?

Look no further – call Pro-Train!

With over 40 years experience Pro-Train certified dog trainers will provide the absolute highest quality private dog training lessons you’ll find anywhere in Orange County and San Diego, CA!

Your results are 100% GUARANTEED for the life of your dog !!!

The Pro-Train team can help you with creating a truly loving and long lasting relationship between you and your dog.

Our Private Dog Training Course is professionally and personally customized for you and your dog.

Don’t wait another day – call Pro-Train now …

Private Dog Training Orange County

There is no dog too skittish, too aggressive, or too old.

Pro-Train certified dog trainers specialize in all aspects of dog training, dog obedience, and Private Dog Training including:

  • Dog Training
  • Obedience Training
  • Puppy Management
  • Puppy Biting
  • Dog Behavior Modification
  • Dog Protection Training
  • Service Dog Training
  • Guide Dog Training
  • Become A Dog Trainer

There are no bad dogs, just dogs who need Pro-Train!

Give us the opportunity to help you and your dog – you’ll be ecstatic with the results!

Call Pro-Train today …

Private Dog Training Orange County

What Areas Do We Service In San Diego?

We’re proud to be North County ‘s premier dog training school and service all areas in the city of Orange County including: Alpine, Bonita, Bonsall, Borrego Springs, Bostonia, Boulevard, Camp Pendleton, Campo, Cardiff, Cardiff by the Sea, Carlsbad, North County, Coronado, Crest, Del Mar, Descanso, Dulzura, North County, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, Fallbrook, Guatay, Imperial Beach, Jacumba, Jamul, Julian, San Diego, La Mesa, Lakeside, Lemon Grove, Leucadia, Lincoln Acres, Mount Laguna, National City, Nestor, Ocean Beach, North County, Olivenhain, Pacific Beach, Pala, Palomar Mountain, Paradise Hills, Pauma Valley, Pine Valley, Potrero, Poway, Rainbow, Ramona, Ranchita, Rancho Bernardo, Rancho Santa FE, North County (County Seat), North County State University, San Luis Rey, Rancho Bernardo, San Ysidro, Santa Ysabel, Santee, Solana Beach, Spring Valley, Tecate, North County, Valley Center, Vista, and Warner Springs.

What Local Zip Codes Do We Serve?

We serve the following cities and zip codes throughout North County, San Diego: 92101, 92102, 92103, 92104, 92105, 92106, 92107, 92108, 92109, 92110, 92111, 92112, 92113, 92114, 92115, 92116, 92117, 92119, 92120, 92121, 92122, 92123, 92124, 92126, 92127, 92128, 92129, 92130, 92131, 92132, 92133, 92134, 92135, 92136, 92137, 92138, 92139, 92140, 92142, 92145, 92147, 92149, 92150, 92152, 92153, 92154, 92155, 92158, 92159, 92160, 92161, 92162, 92163, 92164, 92165, 92166, 92167, 92168, 92169, 92170, 92171, 92172, 92174, 92175, 92176, 92177, 92179, 92182, 92184, 92186, 92187, 92190, 92191, 92192, 92193, 92194, 92195, 92196, 92197, 92198, 92199.

private dog training Orange County on YouTube

Top 10 Cool Tricks To Teach Your Dog

Read more …

 

7 Quick Tips for TOILET TRAINING a Puppy or Dog

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Doggy First Aid Kit – Be Prepared

Accidents happen. Consider a doggy first aid kit to be prepared in the event of an emergency. When your pet is injured, you won’t have time to rummage around in a frantic search for something to help him. First aid has to be right away. For this reason, it’s a very good idea to set aside a box containing your dog’s own medicines and the equipment you will need in case of emergency.

His medicine chest should include the following:

  • Milk of magnesia to serve as a laxative.
  • Adhesive tape and bandages for dressing wounds.
  • Activated charcoal as a poison antidote.
  • Antiseptics, such as Merthiolate, metaphen or peroxide for cleansing wounds, and Neosporin ointment to prevent infection.
  • A rectal thermometer and Vaseline or K-Y lubricant.
  • Hydrogen peroxide, mustard powder or salt for emetics.
  • Burn medicines contained in aerosol sprays, as prescribed by your veterinarian. Aromatic spirits of ammonia for shock treatment.
  • Blunt-ended scissors for cutting hair away from wounds.
  • Benadryl to control swelling and inflammation.

Safety First

Most accidents, after all, are the result of neglect. By far the greatest cause of serious injury and death in dogs, for example, is the automobile. It takes only one moment of neglect, one moment off the leash or out of the fenced yard, to cause this tragedy.

An ounce of prevention will work its proverbial magic if you will only observe a few simple safety rules for your pup. Here, then, are some guidelines for accident prevention.

Keep Your Dog Confined When He’s Outdoors

If your yard is fenced, make sure there are no holes he can wriggle through, that the gate latches firmly and that family and visitors are warned to close it securely. If the yard is not fenced, then you should construct some kind of run or play area for a puppy. It need not be large; even a playpen, placed in a shady spot in the garden, will work as a temporary measure. Put in a weighted pan of water and a few toys to amuse puppy when he’s alone.

For a permanent run, enclose an area with sturdy metal fencing at least 6-feet high (dogs are amazingly adept at climbing). A run 6-feet wide and 20- to 30-feet long is large enough for almost all breeds. Cover the surface with a porous material, such as sand or gravel; plain earth holds the dampness and is unsanitary.

 

Choose a location that provides both sun and shade, keep the run clean and always provide water.

Make sure there are no garden poisons or pesticides within puppy’s reach. Clear the yard of broken glass, stones, small pebbles, or any other objects that he might swallow.

Never Unleash Puppy When You Are Walking Him on a Public Street

In one unleashed instant he might dash into the path of an oncoming car. If he rides in the car with you, always attach his leash to his collar before you open the door; he might bolt head-on into the tragic.

Keep Puppy Confined to His Crate or Playpen When He’s Alone in the House

If he’s getting too old for this kind of treatment, put him in a room that has been carefully puppy-proofed: light cords disconnected, all swallowable objects removed, nothing to chew on but his own safe toys. And keep an eye on him when he has the run of the house.

Make sure all household poisons such as cleaning agents and human medicines are out of reach. He’s not actually looking for trouble, but he does have a way of finding it.

Thanks for reading and becoming better prepared for a puppy emergency! Contact Dogman Mark Castillero for any questions you may have at protraindog@gmail.com

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Dog Trainer in San Diego: The Dog Man Can.