Articles

How to Ease up Your Dog’s Grooming Anxiety

You want your dog groomed, but how do you deal with his anxiety? Your canine family member can’t comprehend the grooming tool revving sounds and often find the touch of the tools on his body, including the sensitive areas, to be very eerie. All these noises are normal to us, yet weird and a potentially threatening situation for a canine that can cause anxiety. Many dog owners avoid groomers, saying “My dog just freaks out when I take her to the groomer.”

Some dogs like or at least tolerate grooming sessions. But not all dogs. If you have tried everything, from introducing him to grooming tools to desensitizing him at home, and anxiety for the groomer is still a major issue, there are some clever ways to help ease the tension for your beloved Fido.

Take the Stress Out of the Car Ride

Car rides can provoke anxiety in some dogs. However, there are some reasons you need to look into that make him nervous and also scared sometimes. One of the main reasons for the anxiety is that he associates the car ride with trips to places he doesn’t like, such as a veterinary office or a groomer. Moreover, motion sickness can add to his fear of riding in cars.

Many people choose to should talk to their vet for preventive measures to cure anxiety issues and to see if any anti-nausea medication can rectify motion sickness. This is warranted for some canines. However, keep in mind that a well-trained dog can manage anxiety through behavior modification and other savvy dog training techniques. In fact, a good canine behaviorist, like Pro-Train, could be a very good option to help make this transition possible. Just remember that a veterinarian is not always the best professional to ease anxiety (a behavioral issue) and the vet may just be inclined to use medication. This is not the best option in our opinion.

Make Your Dog Accustomed to being Handled

Grooming also includes handling of several sensitive areas like his muzzle, eyes, ear, groin, jaw, paws, and rear. You should make your pooch get used to being handled by his groomer. Training plays an important role in making him stay calm throughout the grooming session, especially when he is being touched in his sensitive areas.

A good way to make your dog accustomed to touch in sensitive areas is by desensitizing them to the grooming tools. Introduce the tool as her new toy. Slowly approach her with it and reward each touch with a highly valued treat. Doing so will make her like, or at least bear, with each of your small attempts to desensitize. If your Fifi doesn’t let you touch in sensitive areas like ears, you can start desensitizing from comparatively less sensitive areas followed by treats and gradually moving towards more sensitive areas.

Keeping things familiar to them is another way to keep anxiety at bay. For example, use the same brush for your dog to brush him every time you attempt to brush her fur.

Once your dog senses a new normal with being handled, stays calm, and receptive, she should be good-to-go for a professional grooming session. Remember, you need to imitate your groomer the way he would handle your dog so that every touch and handling will be familiar for him.

Make a Grooming Facility Familiar and Fun

Ask your grooming facility if it allows pets to visit its place, so that your dog can associate happy moments with the place. When you arrive, give your dog treats. Stay in your car in the parking lot for a while and then take him on a walk nearby. Let him do some sniffing around and eat some delicious treats.

You can ask groomer and the staff to perform the same training and desensitization you did with your Fido at home with some more treats. In addition, make him accustomed to lifting and putting down on the floor from a table. This will help your dog to associate his happy memories (treats) with grooming sounds and activities.

Behavior Modification Training Before Sedatives and Medication

As previously mentioned, we believe strongly in the power of behavior modification training. According to Mark Castillero, founder of Pro-Train and author of More than a Dog Whisperer, most dogs can be trained to effectively handle a trip to the groomer with tried and proven behavior modification techniques. He suggests always making training your dog, even before grooming, a top priority.

Of course, there are some instances when your dog is just in need of sedatives. However, this should be the last option on your list and sedatives should only be considered when all other options have been exhausted. Ask yourself the following questions, and the answers will give you a good insight in deciding whether your pooch really needs sedatives or not.

Has your dog always been like this? If not, you may want to consult a vet to check what may have happened. It can be some kind of ear infection or some other pain that makes him extra anxious. Or you might have changed his groomer and he is simply not okay with it.

Have you tried different groomers? Some groomers are more patient than others or they have a different level of expertise that may lead to a smoother grooming session for your dog and have some extra ideas to calm your pooch.

Have you tried to groom your dog yourself? Some canine buddies are less fearful and anxious in their home and comfortable being touched by their parents than a complete stranger. If you have some hands-on experience with grooming, you should give it a shot. Obviously, it is quite better than giving your buddy sedatives, right?

Have you ever observed any aggression in your dog when being groomed? Try to find reasons for it.

Does your dog belong to the breed that has frequent grooming needs?

Does your pooch often get incredibly anxious?

The End Note

An anxious dog makes his parents feel guilty. And it is our duty to make them believe it is all good and there’s nothing to worry about. Anxiety in dogs is real and as complex as much as it is in humans. Here’s hoping that these tips help make the grooming experience a positive one for both you, and your beloved canine.

About the Contributor

Clara Lou is Co-founder and the Head of Marketing at Petlovesbest.com. Pet Loves Best is a one-stop solution for all your pet supplies shopping and pet-related queries.

 

 

Service Dog Training Orange County

Service Dog Training Orange CountyAre you looking for the best service dog training provider in Orange County and surrounding area?

Look no further – call Pro-Train!

With over 40 years experience Pro-Train certified service dog trainers will provide the absolute highest quality service dog training lessons you’ll find anywhere in Orange County, CA!

Your results are 100% GUARANTEED for the life of your dog !!!

The Pro-Train team can help you with creating a truly loving and long lasting relationship between you and your dog.

Our Private Dog Training Course is professionally and personally customized for you and your dog.

Don’t wait another day – call Pro-Train now …

 Service Dog Training Orange County

There is no dog too skittish, too aggressive, or too old.

Pro-Train certified dog trainers specialize in all aspects of dog training, dog obedience, and Private Dog Training including:

  • Dog Training
  • Obedience Training
  • Puppy Management
  • Puppy Biting
  • Dog Behavior Modification
  • Dog Protection Training
  • Service Dog Training
  • Guide Dog Training
  • Become A Dog Trainer

There are no bad dogs, just dogs who need Pro-Train!

Give us the opportunity to help you and your dog – you’ll be ecstatic with the results!

Call Pro-Train today …

Dog Training Encinitas

What Areas Do We Service In Orange County & San Diego?

We’re proud to be Orange County ‘s premier private dog training school and service all areas in the city of San Diego, San Diego including: Alpine, Bonita, Bonsall, Borrego Springs, Bostonia, Boulevard, Camp Pendleton, Campo, Cardiff, Cardiff by the Sea, Carlsbad, North County, Coronado, Crest, Del Mar, Descanso, Dulzura, North County, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, Fallbrook, Guatay, Imperial Beach, Jacumba, Jamul, Julian, San Diego, La Mesa, Lakeside, Lemon Grove, Leucadia, Lincoln Acres, Mount Laguna, National City, Nestor, Ocean Beach, North County, Olivenhain, Pacific Beach, Pala, Palomar Mountain, Paradise Hills, Pauma Valley, Pine Valley, Potrero, Poway, Rainbow, Ramona, Ranchita, Rancho Bernardo, Rancho Santa FE, North County (County Seat), North County State University, San Luis Rey, Rancho Bernardo, San Ysidro, Santa Ysabel, Santee, Solana Beach, Spring Valley, Tecate, North County, Valley Center, Vista, and Warner Springs.

What Local Zip Codes Do We Serve?

We serve the following cities and zip codes throughout North County, San Clemente: 92101, 92102, 92103, 92104, 92105, 92106, 92107, 92108, 92109, 92110, 92111, 92112, 92113, 92114, 92115, 92116, 92117, 92119, 92120, 92121, 92122, 92123, 92124, 92126, 92127, 92128, 92129, 92130, 92131, 92132, 92133, 92134, 92135, 92136, 92137, 92138, 92139, 92140, 92142, 92145, 92147, 92149, 92150, 92152, 92153, 92154, 92155, 92158, 92159, 92160, 92161, 92162, 92163, 92164, 92165, 92166, 92167, 92168, 92169, 92170, 92171, 92172, 92174, 92175, 92176, 92177, 92179, 92182, 92184, 92186, 92187, 92190, 92191, 92192, 92193, 92194, 92195, 92196, 92197, 92198, 92199.


Service Dog Training in the News

‘Fake’ Service Dogs Are Common for Good Reason — Here’s Why – Healthline

https://www.healthline.com

Wed, 10 Apr 2019 19:49:40 GMT

‘Fake’ Service Dogs Are Common for Good Reason — Here’s Why??HealthlineYes, we criticize fake *service* dogs for good reason: They can take away from legitimizing actual *service* dogs. But there’s another layer to the truth. Here are …

Read more …

 

Rego: CSU needed the resolution to allow disciplinary action against fake service dogs – Rocky Mountain Collegian

https://collegian.com

Mon, 15 Apr 2019 05:45:00 GMT

Rego: CSU needed the resolution to allow disciplinary action against fake service dogs??Rocky Mountain CollegianASCSU approves Resolution #48: Change of Student Conduct Code for *Service* Dog Behavior which will hopefully help with fake *service* ani …

Read more …

 

Service Dog Training on YouTube

Our Service Dog | A day in the life through the eyes of Beck

Read more …

 

What Service Dog Training REALLY looks like!

Read more …

 

Private Dog Training San Diego

Private Dog Training San DiegoAre you looking for the best private dog training provider in San Diego and surrounding area?

Look no further – call Pro-Train!

With over 40 years experience Pro-Train certified private dog trainers will provide the absolute highest quality service dog training lessons you’ll find anywhere in San Diego, CA!

Your results are 100% GUARANTEED for the life of your dog !!!

The Pro-Train team can help you with creating a truly loving and long lasting relationship between you and your dog.

Our Private Dog Training Course is professionally and personally customized for you and your dog.

Don’t wait another day – call Pro-Train now …

Private Dog Training San Diego

There is no dog too skittish, too aggressive, or too old.

Pro-Train certified dog trainers specialize in all aspects of dog training, dog obedience, and Private Dog Training including:

  • Dog Training
  • Obedience Training
  • Puppy Management
  • Puppy Biting
  • Dog Behavior Modification
  • Dog Protection Training
  • Service Dog Training
  • Guide Dog Training
  • Become A Dog Trainer

There are no bad dogs, just dogs who need Pro-Train!

Give us the opportunity to help you and your dog – you’ll be ecstatic with the results!

Call Pro-Train today …

Dog Training Encinitas

What Areas Do We Service In San Diego?

We’re proud to be North County ‘s premier private dog training school and service all areas in the city of San Diego, San Diego including: Alpine, Bonita, Bonsall, Borrego Springs, Bostonia, Boulevard, Camp Pendleton, Campo, Cardiff, Cardiff by the Sea, Carlsbad, North County, Coronado, Crest, Del Mar, Descanso, Dulzura, North County, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, Fallbrook, Guatay, Imperial Beach, Jacumba, Jamul, Julian, San Diego, La Mesa, Lakeside, Lemon Grove, Leucadia, Lincoln Acres, Mount Laguna, National City, Nestor, Ocean Beach, North County, Olivenhain, Pacific Beach, Pala, Palomar Mountain, Paradise Hills, Pauma Valley, Pine Valley, Potrero, Poway, Rainbow, Ramona, Ranchita, Rancho Bernardo, Rancho Santa FE, North County (County Seat), North County State University, San Luis Rey, Rancho Bernardo, San Ysidro, Santa Ysabel, Santee, Solana Beach, Spring Valley, Tecate, North County, Valley Center, Vista, and Warner Springs.

What Local Zip Codes Do We Serve?

We serve the following cities and zip codes throughout North County, San Clemente: 92101, 92102, 92103, 92104, 92105, 92106, 92107, 92108, 92109, 92110, 92111, 92112, 92113, 92114, 92115, 92116, 92117, 92119, 92120, 92121, 92122, 92123, 92124, 92126, 92127, 92128, 92129, 92130, 92131, 92132, 92133, 92134, 92135, 92136, 92137, 92138, 92139, 92140, 92142, 92145, 92147, 92149, 92150, 92152, 92153, 92154, 92155, 92158, 92159, 92160, 92161, 92162, 92163, 92164, 92165, 92166, 92167, 92168, 92169, 92170, 92171, 92172, 92174, 92175, 92176, 92177, 92179, 92182, 92184, 92186, 92187, 92190, 92191, 92192, 92193, 92194, 92195, 92196, 92197, 92198, 92199.


Private Dog Training in the News

Awareness needed on guide dogs who assist people with disabilities | Cape Argus – Independent Online

https://www.iol.co.za

Tue, 09 Apr 2019 09:58:00 GMT

Awareness needed on guide dogs who assist people with disabilities | Cape Argus??Independent OnlineMore educational awareness is needed at grassroots level to counter the discrimination visually disabled people face daily.

Read more …

 

How Much Does It Cost To Train a Service Dog? – The Cheat Sheet

https://www.cheatsheet.com

Tue, 04 Dec 2018 08:00:00 GMT

How Much Does It Cost To Train a Service Dog???The Cheat SheetThe heartbreaking image of George H.W. Bush’s *service* dog, Sully dutifully laying by the casket collectively broke the country’s heart. Bush’s spokesperson …

Read more …

 

Private Dog Training on YouTube

11 Awesome Life Hacks For Your Dog

Read more …

 

12 Harmful Things You Do to Your Dog Without Realizing It

Read more …

 

Taking Your Dog to Dog Parks – Do’s and Don’ts

Dogs are our true best friends and just like us they too like to socialize and have a good time outdoors. But, with increasingly crowded cities, it can be difficult to find open, green spaces where they can romp gleefully with their other human and furry friends.

Fortunately, we live in beautiful San Diego, California and there are so many amazing outdoor play opportunities, from hiking trails to beach paths to dog parks that have been designed with your dog’s recreation in mind.

Dog parks can be a wonderful option for many dogs. Dog parks are not for everyone, though. In fact, dog parks can sometimes attract irresponsible owners who let their misbehaved dogs interact and possibly fight with your dog. So you should observe the other dogs’ behaviors before entering and be ready to exit if an unruly dog enters.

In many cases, dog parks are a  fun place to socialize your canine kid, but there are certain said and unsaid rules to follow. Let’s take a look.

good dog trainingMake Sure Your Dog Is Properly Vaccinated and Has Tick and Flea Prevention

Most dogs love dog parks as they get to play to their heart’s content but they can catch numerous diseases and parasites when they are out and about. Therefore, to be on the safer side, it’s always good to vaccinate your dog against common contagious diseases, like distemper and parvovirus before going to a dog park. Puppies especially shouldn’t be around adult dogs until they’re fully vaccinated. As a general rule, puppies should not be taken to dog parks until they’re at least 17 weeks old as their immunity is still underdeveloped by that age.

Also, make sure your dog has tick and flea prevention because dogs ‘will’ interact with other dogs no matter how hard you try to stop them.

Start Training Early

Although dog parks are places where dogs can have uninhibited fun, they should still know their boundaries. Your dog should see you as the pack leader all the time and should obey you even in the presence of his canine friends. This will be very helpful in avoiding dog fights and other unpleasant behaviors, like lunging at other dogs and people, butt sniffing and more.

Exercise Your Dog Beforehand

A hyper dog can be very difficult to handle. An over-excited dog can cause other dogs to feel threatened as well. So, exercise your dog well before taking him/her to a dog park, so that you are in full control.

Let Your Dog Off-Leash Only in Designated Enclosed Areas

Your dog should never be off-leash until he is in a designated off-leash area. This will not just keep him safe but will also prevent altercations with other pet parents.

Always be Attentive

While you may be tempted to indulge in conversations with other pet parents or check your Smartphone while your dog is having fun, it is more important to focus on your canine while at a dog park. You should know where your furry friend is and what he’s doing. This will help you avert unpleasant events and make the dog park experience safe and happy for your pooch.

Never Take a Female Dog in Heat

If you have a female dog in heat, avoid taking her to a dog park as this could cause conflict between other dogs and even unintentional mating.

Don’t Get in the Middle of a Dog Fight

A calm and well exercised dog might never get involved in a dog fight but sometimes dog fights just happen. Here’s what you should in case of a dog fight:

  • Never get in the middle; you may get unintentionally bitten.
  • Try to squirt them with a hose or a water pistol.
  • Try to distract them but never grab your dog by his collar.

Scoop the Poop

Dogs poop can be a source of many harmful parasites and microbes. So to avoid polluting the dog park, always clean up after your pet and encourage others to do so too. A clean, healthy environment is the key to keeping your pooch healthy and happy all the time.

Last but not the least, to end your dog’s day on a happy note pamper him with his favorite treats so that your dog forms a positive association with dog parks.

As always, if you need top-notch training, don’t hesitate to give us a call. We’ve trained over 10,000 dogs! 877-BAD-DOGS

Tell us how you liked the article? Do you have any more rules to add to the list? We’d love to hear from you.

Author Bio

I am Anoop Nain, proud father of four rescued dogs and two Flemish giant rabbits. Besides being a full-time dog father, I am a freelance content writer and an educationist, with more than 6 years experience in the field of content writing. In the span of six years, I wrote for various industries but one project that remains closest to my heart is my stint with People for Animals as their social media page manager. It was while working with them I got an opportunity to educate people on animal rights, pet healthcare, animal welfare and various other issues pertaining to animals.

I have been independently rescuing and rehabilitating injured/orphaned street dogs since my college days and have been actively associated with animal rescue organizations in my city.

I strongly believe that people should always think of adoption first if they are planning to bring home a new pet. It not just saves money but also saves many street and shelter animals from dying an agonizing death without proper food, shelter and healthcare.

Being an educationist, I believe in leading by example so I myself have adopted 4 dogs from streets.  I brought my first pet, Olive home when I found her in a very bad state sitting next to her dead mother. The initial days were tough for both of us but gradually she blossomed into a wonderful dog. My second one, Auro came to us when he was just 2 months old. It was Diwali night and some obnoxious kids were trying to tie crackers to this already terrified pupper’s tail. I had to sneak him inside my house that night as my dad would not have liked the idea of another pet. But, destiny had some awesome plans for both me and Auro and he was welcomed in our family by my dad, albeit after initial reluctance. The other two of my clan, Astro and Jordan were rescued by me when they were really young. They were hit by vehicles and had to undergo surgery. I thought, I would put them up for adoption once they recover from their injuries but sadly (or fortunately) no one turned up. So, we decided to keep them too. It’s 2018, all my puppers are grown up now but each day with them is a new learning experience for me. I know so much about pets (dogs and rabbits in particular) now that people come to me for suggestions and tips. This sums up my love for animals in 400 words. But there’s still a lot more to discuss. So, let’s connect. Feel free to contact me.

 

Five Ways to Help Your Dog Maintain a Happy Home Environment

Dogs and messes can seem to go hand in hand. Despite this fact of life, there are ways we can prevent the worst of them to keep our homes clean and pleasant. Check out the following five tips to help keep your beloved canine from making a mess at home.

First Rule of Thumb: Good Training

A well-trained dog is less likely to go about destroying your home. It’s best to focus on obedience and behavioral training when your canine is a puppy. But if you have recently adopted an older dog, it’s never too late to begin. Behavioral training is the most basic training. Obedience training is a close second and this training will help your pup learn how to live with humans. If your dog has mastered these, look at something called boundary training. This could help your furball to learn to control his or her impulses and to listen to us at all times, no matter the temptation.

Have Adequate Cleaning Supplies

Not all messes are going to be your pup’s fault. Sometimes they happen because of unfortunate circumstances. You can prevent accidents from occurring again (and give yourself peace of mind) by having the right cleaning supplies on hand to ensure you clean up the mess promptly. For potty incidents, have a good enzymatic cleaning solution on hand, which will help with removing smells to prevent your dog from associating the carpet with their bathroom breaks. For issues like fur, have a pet-friendly handheld vacuum cleaner to get into every crevice of your home, including your sofa and under the bed. To keep fur from accumulating in the first place, groom regularly and brush frequently between appointments.

Cannot Overstate this One: Take Walks Consistently

While every breed requires something different, they all need to be walked at least twice a day, and not only to use the bathroom. The reason is simple: A bored, under-stimulated dog is a destructive dog. Again, this isn’t your pet’s fault; instead, it’s a way to entertain themselves as well as get attention or release pent-up nervous energy. If you can’t go for walks yourself, try to have a family member or dog walker give your canine essential exposure to the outside world. Your carpet, backyard, and pillows will thank you.

Invest in Well-Made Enrichment Toys

Similarly, your dog thrives on stimulation and activity. Think about their position, as they may be left at home alone for hours at a time. If you were trapped at home with no entertainment, wouldn’t you become frustrated? This is where enrichment toys can come into play, in a manner of speaking. To discourage your furball from destroying furniture, get him or her a toy or snack that they can chew while you’re gone. When you’re home, make sure you’re engaging with them in some quality play time. After all, a tired dog is less liable to cause a disaster.

Offer Positive Reinforcement

When our pups do something particularly naughty or extra messy, we can be tempted to punish them to prevent the behavior from being repeated. This rarely works, and instead, it teaches our furry friends that they cannot trust us, which may increase negative behavior. Therefore, even when your patience is tested, stick to positive reinforcement. Usually, that involves giving your pooch a snack when they do something good, like get off the couch, or go to their own bed without prompting. So, the next time your dog has an accident on the carpet, instead of shoving their nose in it and telling them they’re bad, wait until they go outside, and then reward that behavior. This way, they associate the act of going outdoors with something nice.

Everyone, including our pets, deserves a happy home environment. That means doing all we can to ensure our houses don’t suffer from messes when we can avoid it. Of course, be patient when they do, but with some effort and preparation, you can avoid jumbles to come.

As always, if you are looking for the best training for your dog, consider an evaluation of your canine here at Pro-Train Innovative Dog Training. We offer a lifetime guarantee on all dogs trained through our programs.

 

Page 3 of 2712345...1020...Last »

Dog Trainer in San Diego: The Dog Man Can.